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BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/catholicchurchesOOIeah 



' 



THE 



CATHOLIC • CHVRCHES ■ OF ■ BOSTON 



AND -ITS -VICINITY -AND 
ST. • JOHN'S • SEMINARY 
BRIGHTON • MASS. 

*ES WITH NOTES AND HISTORICAL INFORMATION 



A FOLIO OF PHOTO-GRAVUI 

COMPILED AND EDITED BY 

WILLIAM A. LEAHY 







Edition de Luxe 



BOSTON • AN D ' NEW ' YORK : 
McCLELLAN : HEARN : AND : COMPANY 



M DCCC XCII 















Enter,.! according to Act of 
Congrcu, in the year /S<?/, by 




in the office of the Librarian 
of Congress, ,it Washington 



WWP/uiTJin/HuuuwiyuuwnnHBn?iH»iiiaHi<«aiii 




REFACE 



1 



•^ " wrote Dr Carroll of Baltimore in .790, the year after his consecration as 
,F all the Catholics in Boston were united wrote Dr. Ca on „ .^ ^^ of 

1 first Bishop of the United States, "their mimbe wo d be ^out ° on School w re . christene d 

worshippers had begun to attend services two yea s fore, n »«M ^ions am0 ng the Indians of Maine, this was 
the Church of the Holy Cross. With ^J^Tf^^Z ,799 their numbers, as calculated from the list of 
the only Catholic congregation in Ne w Engla *d at that ^.^ of over three thousand dol.ars from friendly 
baptisms, had risen to twelve hundred. In this year aided y ^ ^.^ Qf ^ u , urch 

Protestants, Father Cheverus, the Pastor was en b ed ^J"^^ Stre£t Ha]f a century later , in ,8 53 , 

which was afterwards known as the Cathedral* ^^TJ" thousand; and t0 . day in the City of Boston 

irscns srnss n:iu, or - ,„ustratio n by d^ of fc ^ „ . 

°TU -ever, leave but a fee. ^--^ £ 2~*£EZZ 
present evidence of a more convmemg kind as to he param p tQ ^ ^ ^ ar£ 



*- 



TREFACE 



self-sacrificing spirit of a community, not rich in the goods of this world, which has provided their city with so many 
elaborate structures, most of them ornamental to her in their exterior aspect, and all of them useful to her as centres 
of good order and high aspiration. Loyal Catholics, we are convinced, will thank us for plac.ng at their command, 
in a volume worthy of its subject, these admirable illustrations of the edifices which they have been taught to reverence 

as the houses, not of man but of God. 

The greater number of our builders of churches have been true, in their selection of architecture, to the traditional 
Gothic style which it may be said admits of more variety than almost any other. It serves to remind us also, here 
in the New World, of those sublime monuments of the ages of faith, when the human spirit in its expansion could 
feel at home only in presence of vast dimensions, governed to true proportions and relieved with profuse variety of 
detail by the artistic intelligence which prevailed in the mediaeval world. Yet not all our churches have the spue and 
the peaked arch of the Gothic. The Immaculate Conception Church, Grecian in its general effect, though without the 
Grecian porticoes may be counted as one of the most admirable among them; and in some of the newer Churches, as 
the Redemptorist Church and St. Cecilia's, there are successful departures in the direction of Romanesque and Norman 
types. By courageous experiment the time may come when there shall be a style of Church Architecture which may 

oroDerlv be called American. . . .. , 

To thank adequately all of the reverend clergy who have courteous.y aided us in this undertaking would b a 
difficult task It is to their assistance that we are principally indebted for whatever accuracy and mterest the historical 
ites may possess Taken with the illustrations, which represent the highest achievement of skill in this department 
Aey^we may be permitted to say-a vivid and reliable pictoria! history of the Catholic Churches of Boston and 

Vicinity. EDIT0R - 





Brticattb 1875 



Cathedral of the Holy Cross 



WASHINGTON STREET 




GOTHIC STYLE— P. C. KEELY, ARCHITECT 

Archbishop: MOST REVEREND JOHN J. WILLIAMS. D.D. 

Chancellor: Rev. Richard N eagle 

THE T 8 "^: M rT &£S* V^lZZLi? Rev.'joSHU. P. Boons,,, .886-88 
/V««i/ £«/&/-: Rev. Leo P. Boland 

. HE Cathedra, of the Holy °m*™*JgZJ5%?n Sefof KSr? - 

1 early English Gothic style. ^.^K™"^ of its lines and the absence of orna- 

of immense size,- an effect which ,s avored by ft seven y ^ Archbishop), and whtch 

ment (believed to be in accordance with the tas te or ™ h , oft spires , three hun- 

will be heightened still forth ,er when the f™ « J^»™°$3 i/fte original design. As a matter 

^cfw'I i ™i« fg o n U h nd S aJe:The Ct 'cat y hedra. is larger than .many .0 f the famous c^Js^ 

turopJtr" stance tho^e of Strasburg, Salisbury Pisa • V-- R0 " n d s ^ e P t '^thf numerous staged windows 

° it construction are the richly designed rose-w ndow ^8.^^ „, Epis , throne or cathedra from 

ScUe\K^^ 

JSSsStfe ££3=5 HS»^ 

aa2 OTo^ ^ ^TT. , dence._a gift from the clergy of the diocese.- where the Archbishop 
^^t2tt^tt£Z*« Rev. lichard Neagle. 




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OtDicatctJ 1884 



"St. John's Ecclesiastical Seminary 



BRIGHTON 




FACULTY 

Very Rev. Charles B. Rex, S.S., J.C.D., S.T.D., Director 

. r. r. t, \t t? Rrncv STB Rev. S. Dorvaux, S.S., 
Rev. P. P. C B », S.S.. D.D. Rev. OA W S^ ** M. W "J S.S., S.T.L. 
nn nrT Rev L. S. Walsh, S.T.L., JX.l. «-ev. r. ^ . 

" Rev D. jf£»— . S.T.B. Rev. J. R. M»HON», S.S., D.D.. Ph.D. 

, . . , k . hU> of the Cathedral, which Archbishop Williams has accomplished during 

T HE most memorable work next to the *»£*«« *" « ' wWch may challenge comparison with any on this 

I his long episcopate, has been the cs abh*m= °~ advantage/ which it affords, and which a, the same 

continent and with most of those in the Old World t Arae rican. Until within a very few years, 

tim e surrounds tbe candidates for the dergy -*-"£^T£t£« at Troy, Montreal or Baltimore, and in 

students of theology from New England were obliged to re ceiv , th g inconV e„ience of the old system 

.some instances to cross the water to Rome, Pan, Dot ,1m and Lo an R ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

a „d the need of a theological school, which shoud be under hi, penona P ^^ .__ ^ ^ ^^^ 

for the present seminary. A pupil himself of the Suipic^, at Par. £^ ^e direction of Very Rev. John B. Hogan. S.S., D.D., 

*, resuU was the dedication in , 8 8 4 of the theological house -*£^ „ „„ , raini „ g of the clergy. Abbe Hogan was a native 

built of stone, somewhat in the styie ^ 




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' St. John's Ecclesiastical Seminary | 



CONCLUDED 




_* ™a olnistpr a chanel a reception room containing a bust 
th» m-nund Among ts features are a court and cloister, a cnapei, v 

, ph , es j x. - — -• -—-.- r:tr: i y tr:iir --rrrs 

Care is taken to develop all the facalt.es of the m ,ad by a course of study 6 ^ ^ 

^eed upon as best for that purpose. In .be nrs, two v«rs he r - * -*K« ^ ^^ 

Sciences, Holy Scripture. Church H.s.ory, Creek and Hebrew ,n th follow g y ^^ 

Canon Law, Holy Scripture, Church History, Hom.letrcs, Hebrew an I~ <• ^? « « m „„ 

of the hours of the day are though, best for the ««*teh^.. *»*». *«»** , he 

(or ,„e arduous life of self-denial which awai* the T^^JZmL. and a considerable time is assigned each 
3 by no means neglected. No candidate ,s accepted who ,s of un sound 1 cons. ^ ^ ,„ 

£'„ exercise and amusement. Tennis and handball court, and base-b >'^^ J , ^ „ several miles into ft. 

fte foreground of .he picture furnishes good skafng » -- "" , „ more of the faculty. No pains are spared ,0 make the 
neighboring country is taken by the s.uden.s ,n a body accompan d b one o ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ .„ ^ 

young men happy, na.ura, and strong The eh,rf sohc, ude we™ J. *e d, ^ & ^ .^ rf ^ c<j||£ge ,. s . 

building on the left. 




ST. JOHN'S SEMINARY 
BRIGHTON MASS. 



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Iffornmstonr [aib IS89 



ST. CECILIA'S CHVRCH 

BELVIDERE STREET, BACK BAY 



SEATING CAPACITY 14OO 



NORMAN STYLE — C. J. BATEMAN, ARCHITECT 

Pastor: Rev. Richard J. Barry 



CONGREGATION 3000 






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rATHER Richard Barry seems to have caught the secret of Aladdin's lamp, so quickly has 

this Church been erected under his spell. Begun in 1888, it was practically completed in 1889; the 
third monument to his indefatigable energy, which is perhaps the most effective magic at any priest's command. 
St. Cecilia's is notable as the first revival in New England of the old Norman style, illustrated by many 
castles and cathedrals erected during the Norman sway in France and England. The rectory forms part of 
the Church, its rooms being situated in the right front of the building and extending into the tower. There is a certa 
harmony with its surroundings noticeable in the architecture of St. Cecilia's, and it has, also, the practical merit of being 
large enough to accommodate any increase of population which may be anticipated in the Back Bay for years to come. 



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ST. CECILIA'S CHURCH 
BELVIDERE ST. BACK BAY. BOSTON. 






DtDiratrft 1877 *« " ,pl ^ lw '" fl " 

HOLY TRINITY CHVRCH 




SHAWMUT AVENUE 



GOTHIC STYLE -P. C. KEELY, ARCHITECT 



Present Rector, 




tr™ s T .SaS-u Rev. Ernst A. Reiter, S.J., 1854-56. Rev. J- 
-- *""": Tl ^58 Re^ 'no^Steihbacher, S.J., ,858-59- Rev. Er NS t A. 

B. CATTAN., S-J^^SS.^ i8sg70 ^ Jakob SmeoN| SJ( l870 _ 7? 



Rev. F. X. Nopper, S.J. 




th, first people to establish a Church in which a foreign, language was 
JHE Germans were the first peoj ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ long ago as ^ 

& 1 spok en. Their P-r pr^ ^ ^ rf ^ ^ Duri „ g Bi hop p k s 

and made some attempt to umte the scatter ^ ^ cQme mto the hands 

administration the Suffolk Street Church was ded.caM m 4 ^ ^ ^^ The 
0{ *, Jesuits, all difficulties which '—^'eZ numbers from the Roxbury district. As a Cas, they 

peop ,e come from all sections of the c,t, but m ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ , Qve for th ,„. 

are unusually properous. intelligent and umted. A well 

religion and their language. 




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(EoHMtrairt) 1875 



1MMACVLATE CONCEPTION 

HARRISON AVENUE, CORNER OF CONCORD STREET 



GRECIAN STYLE — P. C. KEELY, ARCHITECT 




CONGREGATION IO.OOO 

1884-87. Rev. Nicholas Russo, S.J., 1887-88. Very Kev. 
Robert Fulton, S.J., 188S-90 



Rev, Edward I. Devitt, S.J. 
Present Rector: 



n,„„ m« fmnit Church of the Immaculate Conception. 
n church in our city is better known than ^J^lSSi of the services, including music 
IN The quiet beauty of the interior and *e «™» ■££ "° , Catholics from a „ 

and discourses addressed to the mos -'..vated hearers d aw th y^^ ^ ^ 

parts of the city, but many people of other d—ahons^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ 

Marked by simplicity and taste rather than ^ pomp. They ^app ^J^ ^ ^ ,, 

ever as the Church is crowded at all the services wim » accommodations. 

S^ned to its charge. At the festival seasons thou ^« ^.^Idi-g of the Young Mens Catholic 
Boston College, with several hundred students and , ^ ^^ of , he b ,, ty of 

Association of Boston College, are among ^^nthghlr branch's, like the Christian Brothers n lower 
the Jesuits in organizing good works. For educat on .^t «, fes5iona l men and clergymen of Boston who h. 

crades the Jesuits have always displayed smgular gemus. The ,m«, p (hcir ^^ traini d nstructl0 n 

Stated from Boston College during the Pj-J^»J^ p u , on, and contains all the departments -table to meet 
The Association Build.ng is a fruit of the act iv.ty oil "• d d and smoking ro oms, parlors, debating 

the various tastes of its thousand members, - a hbrar*a g£>— J-^ as Commencemc „t Exercises by the students 
hall, and a large hall in ^^ZZ^JS^ *« kinds ° f ^ "^ ^^ ^ 

1£ ^tt&^ZZ*** t0 influence ' and with great success ' 





IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
BOSTON. 



ROMAN STYLE— P. C. KEELY, ARCHITECT 

Previous Pastors: Rev. Dav.o Walsh, 1S54-57. Most Rev. John j. W.lliams, D.a, 1857-66. Rt. 

Rev. James A. Healy, D.D., .866-75. Rev. A. Sherwood Healy, i8 7S . Rev. Thomas 

H. Shahan, iS 75 -S 5 - Rt- Rev - Matthew Harkins. D.D., 1885-87 




OctiicatcD IS75 



ST. JAMES' CHVRCH 

HARRISON AVE., NEAR KNEELAND ST. 



Present Pastor: Rev. William P. McQoaid 

•HE first Catholic Church for the people of the South Cove district was located on Beach 
- Street This was succeeded by the brick structure at the corner of Harvard and Albany 
Streets afterwards disposed of to the Boston & Albany Railroad, when the congregation was trans- 
ferred t ,1 costly building on Harrison Avenue, built by Bishop Healy. The parish has never ceas d 
InainlproLence, owing to its s,, the elegance of its Churchy especially m *e ~ «.£ 
high repuLon of its pastor, No .ess than three New England .shops £^^ '^ and 
the pastorate of St. James',- Archbishop Williams from the o, C-«™ Jr 7^ 





ST. JAMES' CHURCH 
HARRISON AVENUE, BOSTON. 






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Orticatrt 1S77 



ST. MARY'S CHVRCH 



ENDICOTT STREET 



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SEATING CAPACITY 1800 



ROMAN STYLE— P. C. KEELY, ARCHITECT 



CONCRKGATION 50OO 



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MM Pastors: Rev. W1U.IAM W.ley, ,835. Rev. P. O'Beirne. Rev. Mich am Healy Rev. 

Thomas J. OTlaiieriy, D.D. R, Rev. John B. PATRICK, DD Rev. Patrick .-co,, 

Rev. John McElroy, S.J., .847- Rev. B. J. Wiget, S.J. Rev. John 

Barrister, S.J. Very Rev. Robert W. Brady, S.J. Rev. Denis 

O'Kane, S.J. Very Rev. Robert W. Brady, S.J., 1S70-77. 

Rev. William H. Duncan, S.J., 1877-91 



* 



Present Pastor: - 



Rev. Michael F. Byrne, S.J. 




S 



T MARY'S with the house of the Jesuits in the rear, oeeupies practically an entire block. 
^ T et Tbesides, a large schoo.-bui.ding extending from Stil.man Street to Cooper Street 
and attended"; eleven hundred ho y s and girls. On all this ^uabU proper* ^- jJW-A 
glance at the .on g .1st of pastors wi.I reveal the "^^ Z^ ^^» * 'he Mexican war. 

work than those located in the North End. n , stont c of the Church and exchanged positions 

After an unusually long tenure. Father Duncan has res.gned the pastora 
with Rev. M. F. Byrne, formerly Superintendent of the large Paroch.al School. 




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SEATING CAPACITY IOOO 




Corner Sunt laio in IS85 



NOTRE DAME DES VICTOIRES 



ISABELLA STREET, BOSTON 



STYLE OF THE FRENCH RENAISSANCE 



CONGREGATION I 5OO 

KG CAPACITY IOOO QC..Qo 

C , T ,oo, o, Rov PeRE Al'DDIFRED, b.M., I&»4-09- 

Acting Pastor: Rev. A. Police, S.M. 



■HE work of uniting the French-speaking Catholics of Boston and the suburb* 
y Everett, Maiden, Cambridge, and Somervil.e, was begun only ten years go 
. ■ ■ c The nriests who have been prosecuting the task 

and is as yet ,„ ,ts infancy Th pr- ^ order ^ ^ . % ^ 

church and rectory on Isabella Street. archdiocese, the Boston 

Likethe French Missions in Haverhill, ^£^££1 Tested, ten thousand peop.e of 
Mission is constantly augmented by immigration. ^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ mi5sion deve]ops lts 

this nationality scattered within a radius of a few m, es. so ^ ^.^ ^ ^^ ^ sustained 

attractive power, the new church will prove none g ^ ^ o( the great Christian nation 

by the French people m the death of P * C > of ^ pioneer priests . 

which gave Boston her first bishop and the most 





Srtitatrt 1862 



ST. STEPHEN'S CHVRCH 



HANOVER STREET 




Previous Pastor: Rev. George F. Hasans, ,86,-7* 

Present Pastor: Rev. Michael Moran 
y u c««11 rhaDel on Moon Street, under 

Ref G F. Haskins. In .862, the Moon Street k I and dedicated under the 

IT. parochial ^^^XKu^ U* *Z«ZZ2Z P =i which 
todistC^^^ 

new names for the streets, new f^f^^X^ "> ' he inteH ° r " y ,***" ^"d as a result of this the 
Street in ,870. and **~W***£^£?JLl b ^ North End oMate g*^^ in the city. 

con ^z ?^-aSs=£ wat ^ »£ Ess £ aise ; 

but it is interesting and suggestive 




ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH 
HANOVER ST., BOSTON- 



§5^^*^- 





SACRED HEART OF JESUS 



NORTH SQUARE, BOSTON 



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m ITALIAN SPHAK.NO CAT..OL.C, 
SEATING CAPACITY 9 00 ^ ^^ Mis , Ap . 

Previous Rector: Rev. Lui« Parou.M.-. Ap. -888-90. 






ZVtOUS Jtcccvr . »v^... 

OINCE .874 the It^n/imm^^ 

^ _ . ^~ , - j.._»~J Kir. t.wn men , , . 1 :„ «.!,<» mam 



NCE ,874 the Italia, -*?*»»**£ oft b 8 S an^ The present rector 
^ North End, conducted by two members ° ^ e ; f seven hund red in the ma,n 

brated clergyman who formerly occupied its pu lpi t i duf . the war of l8ia . On his 

immigrants come from all parts 01 iwiy, . thls 1S a matter ot less c°nset strik ing fact, 

speaking «orld entertains of *™™*2£XZ* industrious, and phy.ta.lly we 1 made It «a stn « 
They are a people of great natural '"telhgence. g ^ fo n condlt ons of life Very lev 

m „reover, that no other race '£%$££& drenfretain the language of the.r par en«. Th s f a et ^ 
children, as compared vvtth French and German hedst be remembered mcon^erm ^ ^ 

as-h-iss tax: ;s <~ d «*»*-— h - a ,arge ma, ° 

fold of the Catholic church. 



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SACRED HEART CHURCH .ITALIAN) AND ST. STEPHEN'S SCHOOL 

NORTH SQUARE. BOST" 




Drtirntcti IS80 



ST. PATRICK'S CHVRCH 

DUDLEY STREET, BOSTON HIGHLANDS 



SIATIHG CAPACITY , = 50 GOTHIC STYIE-W. P. WENTWOETH. AKCHITKT CO»GREGAT,ON 800O 

Prniou, Pvtor: R«v. Thouas Lvnch, .835-70 *««./ fl»*r, Rev. Joseph H. Gallagher 




THE old St Patrick's Church on Northampton Street, which is still attended by a part of the 
^ 1 parishioners, was built during the height of the Know-Nothing excitement of ,833-35. Fear- 
ing a fate for the new Church similar to that which had overtaken the Ursu.ine Convent, the msuranc >com- 
lies refused to insure the structure unless it were rendered practically fire-proof. In consequence of th 
Zu. while the men of the parish guarded the wa„s, a brick sheathing -^J^^S 

,^.i..nt —8 *. *-B— * - *-*• •if," '"f ""■ Ji "':r?„i"',™™,d b, IK UIK Si,l„ .1 

fc r:xt:-,rr;K ::,:"k";:;:t iXTC: - i- - > * 

provided with a school for girls. 




ST. JOSEPH'S CHVRCH 

CIRCUIT STREET, ROXBURY 




SKATING CAPACITY IIOO 

Prnnous Pastor: Rev. P. O'Be.rne, .846-83 Permanent R<c<or , Rev. Hugh P. Smyth 









ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH 
BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 



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ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH 
CIRCUIT ST.. BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 




ST. FRANCIS DE SALES 

VERNON STREET, ROXBURY 



GOTHIC STYLE — P. C. KEELY, ARCHITECT 



Previous Pastors: Rev. James Griffin, 1865-77. Rev. John Delahunty, 1S77-S8 
Present Pastor : Rev. Patrick J. Daly 



THE Catholics of the northern section of Roxbury purchased an old Baptist Church on Ruggles 
Street in 1853, and occupied it for several years under the charge of various clergymen. 
This small wooden structure was destroyed by a fire of mysterious origin. A lot of land was 
subsequently purchased on Vernon Street, and the present church erected by Rev. James Griffin. 
It is one of the few churches which are free from debt. 
Within a stone's throw of the Church on Vernon Street is situated one of the most important charitable 
institutions in Boston, — the House of the Angel Guardian. Orphan, friendless and wayward boys are here pro- 
vided with an asylum which combines all the advantages of a well-disciplined school and a devout Christian 
home. The Brothers of Charity, twelve in number, connected with the House, are unsurpassed as teachers 
for this class of pupils. They give them a practical education, secure them situations, if possible, as soon as they are 
of suitable age, and watch over them with friendly interest during the first years of their struggle with life. The 
founder, and for many years the conductor, of this useful institution was Rev. George F. Haskins, one of those convert 
priests who come over to Catholicism from time to time, and bring all their New England vigor into the service of 
their adopted Church. Father Haskins was one of the pastors of the old Church on Ruggles Street. 





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Drbirntrt 1878 

Ovr Lady of Perpetval Help 

1545 TREMONT STREET, ROXBURV 

ROMANESQUE STYLE — WILLIAM SCHICKEL, ARCHITECT 

Previous Rectors: Rev. Joseph Wissel, C. SS. R., 1870-71. Most Rev. William Gross, D.D., C. SS. R. 

(present Archbishop of Oregon), 1871-73. Rev. Leopold Petsch, C. SS.R., 1873-77. Rev. 

William Loewekamp, C. SS. R., 1877-81. Rev. Joseph Henning, C. SS. R., 

1881-87. Rev. A. J. McInerney, C. SS., R., 1887-90. 

Present Pastor: Rev. John J. Frawlev, C. SS. R. 



THE members of this young monastic order, founded in the last century by St. Alphonsus 
Liguori, came among us a few years ago with the zeal of a band of crusaders. Of the 
conversions and well-attested cures which they have effected by their ministrations we need say 
nothing to Boston Catholics, with whom already the " Mission Church " has begun to take on 
something of the character of a shrine, like the shrine of Ste. Anne de Beaupre or of The Lady 
of Guadaloupe. It is a satisfaction to all that this section of Roxbury has recently been organ- 
ized into a parish and placed in such capable hands. 

The house of the clergy (on the left of the photograph) possesses many features of historical interest. 
The original Brinley, Pierpont or Dearborn mansion, as it was successively called from various owners, was 
built in 1723. During the war of the Revolution it became conspicuous as the headquarters of Major-General 
Artemas Ward, and on one occasion was the scene of a council of war between Washington and his advisers. Sixty 
years later, on the night of the burning of the Ursuline Convent, the persecuted nuns fled to Roxbury and were main- 
tained on the Dearborn estate for several months, protected by the Protestant proprietor. A link was added to the 
chain of Catholic tradition connected with the place when the Redemptorists in 1S69 fitted it up for their first mass in 
this city. By a singularly unfortunate coincidence, on the night of the day when the corner-stone of the splendid new 
church was laid, two-thirds of the old wooden building was destroyed by fire. The chamber in which Washington laid 
his plans against the British was spared, however, and still forms a part of the restored structure which has seen so 
many vicissitudes. 





CHURCH OF OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP 
TREMONT ST., ROXBURY DISTRICT. 




DcDicitrD 1870 iConstrratfD 1884 

ST. AUGUSTINE'S 

DORCHESTER STREET, SOUTH BOSTON 



GOTHIC STYLE—- P. C. KEEI.Y, ARCHITECT. 
Pastor: Rev. Denis O'CallaGHAN 

HEN South Boston was still one of the remote suburbs of the 

mortuary chapel of St. Augustine on Dorchester Street was built by Bishop 

(^ Cheverus, and the adjoining field laid out as a Catholic cemetery. In the following 

year the chapel was opened to receive the remains of Rev. F. A. Matignon, a native of 
France and associate of Bishop Cheverus, and the first priest who died in Boston. Since then, 
many clergymen of note have been buried by the side of Father Matignon, among others for 
a time Rt. Rev. John B. Fitzpatrick, until the removal of his remains to a crypt under the 
sanctuary of the Cathedral, where they now repose. In 1831, as explained in the note on SS. 
Peter and Paul's Church, the chapel was enlarged for public worship. It has long been 

disused for this purpose, but is still occasionally opened for interments and is an object of much interest 

to visitors. 

The Church which has adopted the name of this historic chapel, is of recent establishment, having 
been built and paid for in a remarkably short time by the efforts of its able pastor. It is situated on 
high ground at the foot of Dorchester Heights, commanding in its site, and exceedingly clear-cut and dis- 
tinguished in. its architecture. 




SEATING CAPACITY 1300 




DrtitaltU 1870 

ST. AUGUSTINE'S 

DORCHESTER STREET, SOUTH BOSTON 



(..mile STYLE — P. C. KEELY, ARCHITECT. 
Pastor: Rev. Denis O'Cai.i.agiian 



WHEN South Boston was still one of the remote suburbs of the City, the small 
mortuary chapel of St. Augustine on Dorchester Street was built by Bishop 
Cheverus, and the adjoining field laid out as a Catholic cemetery. In the following 
year the chapel was opened to receive the remains of Rev. F. A. Matignon. a native o! 
France and associate of Bishop Cheverus, and the first priest who died in Boston. Since then, 
many clergymen of note have been buried by the side of Father Matignon, among others for 
a time Rt. Rev. John B. Fitzpatrick, until the removal of his remains to a crypt under the 
sanctuary of the Cathedral, where they now repose. In 1831. as explained in the note on SS. 
Peter and Paul's Church, the chapel was enlarged for public worship. It has long been 
disused for this purpose, but is still occasionally opened for interments and is an object of much interest 

to visitors. 

The Church which has adopted the name of this historic chapel, is of recent estabhshment, having 
been built and paid for in a remarkably short time by the efforts of its able pastor. It is s.tuated on 
high ground at the foot of Dorchester Heights, commanding in its site, and exceedingly clear-cut and d,s- 
tinguished in its architecture. 








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OVR LADY OF THE ROSARY 1 



WEST SIXTH STREET, SOUTH BOSTON 



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SEATING CAPACITY 900 



GOTHIC STYLE — P. W. FORD, ARCHITECT 



Pastor: Rev. John J. McNultv 



CONGREGATION 3OOO J \H 






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'HE parish of Our Lady of the Rosary is the youngest offshoot of the old SS. Peter and Paul's, 
and is still in its early infancy, — a fortunate condition, in some respects, since the limited 
area and the comparative smallness of the congregation enable the pastor to exercise spiritual control in person 
over a larger proportion of his flock. We say "comparative smallness," because in a Protestant Church a congre- 
gation of three thousand would be considered very large. It is not to be denied that the small attendance at 
Protestant churches has certain practical advantages, especially in the Sunday-school, where the children usually 
enter into direct and intimate relations with the clergyman. The same conditions working in a Catholic Church pro- 
duce the same effect, and we frequently find that the best results are obtained in quiet parishes of limited numbers, 
like that of Our Lady of the Rosary. 

There are few Protestant families in this district, and the prospects are excellent for a large expansion of Catholic 

population in the direction of Dorchester Avenue. 







OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY 
SOUTH BOSTON. 




GOTHIC STYLE — P. C. KEELY, ARCHITECT CONGREGATION 10,000 

Previous Pastors: Rev. TEIiENCE FlTZSlMMONS, 1845-53. Very Rev. P. F. Lyndon, 1853-63. 
Present Pastor: Rev. William A. Blknkinsop 

THE first generation of Catholics in South Boston was obliged to undergo the usual hard- 
ships of pioneers. The nearest place of worship was the Cathedral on Franklin Street, 



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BrtiuttO 1853 



SS. PETER AND PAVL'S 

BROADWAY, SOUTH BOSTON 




and as there was but one road to the city in those days (over Dover Street Bridge) and no 
public conveyance, the journey was long and difficult. In 1S31, St. Augustine's Mortuary Chapel 
was fitted up as a temporary Church, and continued to be used as such until SS. Peter and Paul's 
was ready for dedication, in 1845. During the following twenty years, 1845-65, this new parish 
included the whole of the peninsula. Since that year it has seen the successive development from 
within its borders of four flourishing churches, namely, The Gate of Heaven, new St. Augustine's, 
St. Vincent's, and Our Lady of the Rosary, in the order named. The former SS. Peter and Paul's 
Church was burned in 1848, and the present sombre and striking edifice erected on its site by Vicar-General 
Lyndon, renowned for the share which he took in the building of the new Cathedral. 

One of Father Blenkinsop's first acts as pastor was to establish the Academy of the Sisters of Notre Dame, 
which enrolls a thousand girls of the parish annually in its various departments. This institution has already 
graduated hundreds of educated young ladies, who carry into the world that refinement of manner and admirable 
good sense which characterize those whose girlhood has been passed under the hallowing influence of Catholic sisters. To Father 
Blenkinsop also is due the credit of having founded the parochial school in the Gate of Heaven parish. He is a member of 
a family which has contributed great services to the Church, having had a sister who was Mother-Superior of the Sisters of 
Charity in the United States, and a brother in the Society of Jesus, at one time President of Georgetown University. He 
still remains an accomplished gentleman, actively interested in music, educational matters, and the welfare of his people, and 
his benignant and venerable figure is saluted respectfully by all citizens of South Boston, without distinction of en ■- d, 



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SEATING CAPACITY 1300 

Previous Pastor: Rev. Michael Lane, 1874-77 




DrtiirntcD 1874 

ST. VINCENT DE PAVL'S 

E STREET, SOUTH BOSTON 



ROMAN STYLE COMPLETED BY P. C. KEELV 



Present Pastor: Rev. William J. Corcoran 



Protestant Church on Purchase Street was bought by Bishop Fitzpatrick in 1848, and dedi- 
cated for Catholic worship under the name of St. Vincent de Paul's Church. In 1872, 
when Fort Hill was torn down, it was one of the last buildings to be razed. The need of a new Church in 
South Boston being felt at that time, the stones of the Purchase Street edifice were removed and used in its 
construction, and the name of the old Church adopted for the new one. Coincidently with this event there 
was a larcre exodus of Catholics from Fort Hill to South Boston, many of whom, with their descendants, are 
still, by this circumstance, members of St. Vincent's parish. 

Among the pastors of old St. Vincent's were Revs. M. T. Gallagher, E. J. Sheridan and M. Moran. 





ST. VINCENT'S CHURCH 

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ttcaDy for (Consrtranon 

"Chvrch of the Most Holy Redeemer 

MAVERICK STREET. CORNER OF LONDON, EAST BOSTON 



liUTHIC STYLE — P. C. KEEIV, ARCHITECT 



Previous Pastors: Rev. NICHOLAS J. A. O'Brien, 1844-47. Rev. Charles McCallion. 1847-51. 
Rev. William Wiley, 1851-55. Rev. James FittON, 1855-81 




Present Pastor: Rev. Lawrence P. McCarthy 



THE Catholic pioneers in East Boston, like their brethren in many other parts, had to content 
themselves with a discarded Protestant chapel, the Maverick Congregationalist Church, which 
was dedicated for them under the patronage of St. Nicholas. The natural impulse of Catholics, however, is to 
build churches of outward grandeur, in keeping with the divine ceremonies that are conducted within them. 
There is ample proof, we think, in this volume, that even here, in our prosaic American cities, the Church 
stands as firmly as ever for picturesqueness in architecture. 

Following out this tendency, the East Boston Catholics did not remain long satisfied with their renovated 
meeting-house. A larger and more characteristic Church was built by Father Fitton, and the old building converted 
into a convent, -the mother-house in this district of the Sisters of Notre Dame, who have since branched into each of 
the other three island parishes. Twelve nuns of this Order are installed here in charge of over seven hundred pupils. 







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OUR LADY t°h f e ASSUMPTION 



Sl'MNER STREET, EAST BOSTON 



SEATING CAPACITY l6oO 



ROMANESQUE STYLE P. C. KEELY, ARCHITECT. 

Pastor: Rev. Joseph II. Cassin 



CONGREGATION 4,300 



THE four poetically named churches in East Boston vie with each other in 
cherishing the memory of their common founder, Rev. James Fitton. Fr. 



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Fitton was a priest of the old school, the son of parents who were members of 
the first congregation of one hundred in the School Street Chapel, and himself a pupil of 
Bishop Fenwick and (with Rev. William Wiley) the first priest ordained in Boston. 
The first part of his life was spent in missionary work in various fields, but his later 
years present a record of unbroken service to the Catholics of East Boston. Having 
lived to celebrate the golden jubilee of a priestly career which spanned the administrations of Bishops 
Fenwick and Fitzpatrick and a large part of Archbishop Williams', he died in 1SS1, leaving behind 
him a lasting monument to his labors in the prosperity of his little island diocese. Fr. Cassin is a 
nephew of Fr. Fitton and is carrying on his work with no little of the family energy. His parochial 
school is attended by over eight hundred children of both sexes. 



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CHURCH OF OUR LADY OF THE ASSUMPTION, WITH PAROCHIAL RESIDENCE 



Sumner st., east boston. 



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DrbicatcD 1874 

SACRED HEART OF JESVS 

BROOKS AND MORRIS STREETS, EAST BOSTON 



SEATING CAPACITY IIOO GOTHIC STYLE — J. H. BESARICK, ARCHITECT l ONCREGATION 4500 

Previous Pastor: Rev. L. P. McCarthy, 1874-81 Present Pastor: Rev. Michael Clarke 





IN what is known as the Third Section of East Boston, away from the wharves and business 
blocks that give this section of the city its commercial importance, is a territory which is 
principally occupied by dwelling-houses. This comprises the youngest, but already the largest, parish in the 
island. The land for the Church was purchased by Father Fitton in 1869, and the ceremony of dedication 
performed by Archbishop Williams on the feast-day of the Sacred Heart in 1874. During the first years of 
its existence, the pastor of the parish was Rev. L. P. McCarthy, a native of East Boston. On the death of 
Father Fitton in 1881, Father McCarthy was transferred to the Church of the Most Holy Redeemer, and Rev. Michael 
Clarke called to succeed him from the Star of the Sea. 

Like the other East Boston parishes, the Sacred Heart is provided with a thoroughly equipped school, under the 
Sisters of Notre Dame. There are eleven teachers and over seven hundred pupils. The school-building is conveniently 
situated in the rear of the Church, occupying the left of the triangular group, which is represented in our photograph. 



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SACRED HEART CHURCH, PAROCHIAL RESIDENCE AMD SCHOOL 

EAST BOSTON. 




DrtiicatrtJ 1808 



CHVRCH OF ST. MARY 

STAR OF THE SEA 

SARATOGA AND MOORE STREETS, EAST BOSTON 




congregation (including Winthrop) 2000 

Previous Pastors: Rev. James Fitton. Rev. D. J. O'Farrell. Rev. Michael Clarke. 
Rev. John B. O'Donnell, 188 i-8-, 

Present Pastor: Rev. Hugh Roe O'Donnell 




'HE Star of the Sea parish comprises that portion of East Boston which is farthest from the 
city proper and adjoins Chelsea and Winthrop. One of the tasks which the present pastor 
set himself, on taking charge in 18S3, was to build a chapel for the residents and summer visitors of the latter 
town. Another was the establishment of a parochial school. Both of these he has successfully accomplished. 
St. John the Evangelist's Church in Winthrop is regularly attended from the Star of the Sea, and the parochial 
school, taught by seven Sisters of Notre Dame, occupies a new and extensive building, with an attendance of 
three hundred and twenty pupils. This is obviously a large proportion of the children of the parish. Rev. Hugh Roe 
O'Donnell is one of the clergymen who realize most keenly the necessity of combating, both in public and private, the 
vice of intemperance, which is so prevalent among all classes. He has appeared on many platforms in conjunction with 
prominent workers in the temperance cause, and in his own district has used the great power of the Church worthily 
and successfully for the furtherance of this great practical reform. 



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ST. MARY STAR-OF-THE-SEA CHURCH 

EAST BOSTON. 




THE NEW 

GATE OF HEAVEN CHVRCH 

Corner of I and FOURTH STREETS, SOUTH BOSTON 




Previous Pastors: Rev. James Sullivan, 1865-68. Rev. Emiuano Gerbi, 1868-75. 
F. Higgins, 1875-86. Rev. Theodore A. Metcalf, 18S6-90 

Present Pastor: Rev. Robert J. Johnson 

N this district, as in every other district of the city, we find the same indications of 

r~~S 1 Catholic growth,— an increasing congregation, a Church becoming more and more inad- 
equate to contain them. Realizing the great inconvenience which arises from this inadequacy, and 
finding his people cheerfully disposed to share the heavy responsibility with him, Father Johnson has 
begun°preparations for the erection of a larger Church on the land formerly occupied in part by St. 
Michael's Parochial Hall. The new Church, although not extravagantly planned, will be on a scale 
of elegance to correspond with the means of the parishioners; and, under the skilful treatment of 
the architect, Mr. P. W. Ford, co-operating with the judgment of a pastor whose scholarly tastes 
are very notable, it is expected to be an ornament to the section in which it is located. The new 
of Heaven Church will be Gothic in style and will seat about thirteen hundred. 
To illustrate the ramifying influence of the Catholic religion in a typical flounshmg parish, we may 
mention the various organizations connected with the Gate of Heaven Church. St. Joseph's Academy, under the 
charge of Sisters of St. Joseph, is the parochial school for girls. The Conference of St. Vincent de Paul is a soci- 
ety of laymen which distributes annually about two thousand dollars among the poor of the parish. The City Point 
Catholic Association is a social club of young men of good character who occupy a handsomely furnished buildmgo their own. m 
The Married Men's, Married Women's, Young Men's and Young Women's Sodalities, the Holy Name Societies, and the League lj\ 
of the Sacred Heart, are associations for prayer and devotion. The children of the Sunday school, taught by the nuns of the con-^ 7 
vent and by young ladies, are divided for instruction into bible, catechism and prayer classes, and for religious practices are 
enrolled in a number of sodalities. The spiritual supervision of all these bodies falls, in a greater or less degree upon the 
shoulders of the clergy. Furthermore, the Catholic inmates of the Carney Hospital, of the Perkins Institute for the Bl.nd. and of 
several State institutions located in this parish, require constant attendance. 






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Previous Pastors: Rt. Rev. P. T. O'Reilly, D.D., 1862-64. Rev. P. J. Canny, 1864-65. Very Rev. 

P. F. Lyndon, 1865-66. Rev. Bernard O'Reilly, 1866-70. Very Rev. P. F. Lyndon, 

1870-78. Rev. William J. Daly, 1878-83 



Present Pastor: 




OrtJicatcl) 1802 



ST. JOSEPH'S CHVRCH 



CHAMBERS STREET 



Very Rev. William Byrne, D.D 



'HIRTY-FIVE years ago a hall on Cambridge Street sufficed to accommodate the Catholics of 
the West End. They had no pastor of their own, but were attended by priests sent from 
the old Cathedral, including, among others, the present Archbishop of Boston. In 1862 the Twelfth Congrega- 
tionalist Church, on Chambers Street, was purchased and refitted for Catholic purposes. Built in 1824, it has 
still, like St. Stephen's, the exterior aspect of an old-fashioned meeting-house, and one must go inside to realize 
fully the change that has taken place. Its pastor, Vicar-General Byrne, has had eminent success as an admin- 
istrator, both of parochial and diocesan affairs, and as president of Mount St. Mary's College in Maryland, a venerable 
institution which owes its present excellent financial status mainly to the exertions of the pastor of St. Joseph's. 




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CHAMBERS ST., BOSTON. 



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DtJJitattB 1887 

ST. CATHERINE'S CHVRCH 

VINE STREET, CHARLESTONS 



RENAISSANCE STYLE — C. J. RATEMAN, ARCHITECT 

Pastor: Rev. Matthew T. Boylan 




N 1887, Rev. M. J. Supple, of St. Francis de Sales', finding his parish inconveniently large, 

divided it, with the sanction of the Most Reverend Archbishop, and built St. Catherine's for 

..ie residents of the eastern section. It is the third Church in Charlestown, of whose thirty-seven thousand 

people nearly one-half, according to the estimates furnished us by the pastors, which are in all cases very moderate, 

profess the Catholic faith. The present pastor has carried the Church nearly to completion, and has added 

the large parochial residence. With one exception this is the youngest parish in the city, and its history is yet 

to be made. Starting with over four thousand parishioners, in a prosperous district, it should in time rise to a high 

position among the city parishes. 




■ ■■ -<MMUa_ 




ST. CATHERINE'S CHURCH 

CHARLESTOWN. MASS. 




CTonstcratcO 1884 



ST. FRANCIS DE SALES 

Bunker Hill Street, Charlestown 



ROMAN-CELTIC STYLE P. C. KEELV, ARCHirFCT 



Previous Pastors: Rev. Georoe A. Hamilton, 1855-65. Rev. Michael J. Supple, 1865-88 
Present Pastor: Rev. James N. Supple 



CT. Francis de Sales' Church was the first parish Church in the Archdiocese of Boston which 

^ was freed from debt and consecrated, antedating the Church of St. Augustine in this honor 

by a very few months. The parish property includes the parochial residence and a school-building 

of seventeen rooms, which accommodates at present about four hundred and fifty boys and girl,. 

The Church is built of blue-stone in a peculiar style, modelled, we should say, after some one 

of the scanty specimens which Puritan destructive zeal has left us of the ancient chapels bu.lt in Ireland 

before the tenth century. These chapels, though usually small (the immense Gothic structures, designed to 

accommodate the entire population of a town at once, were hardly in their infancy then), and Roman in their 

style, possessed great beauty of a very original stamp. Cormac's Chapel, on the Rock of Cashel, is one of the 

most admired among them, both for its compact and perfect structure, which makes it apparently as secure from 

collapse as a work of Nature herself, and for the exquisite carvings with which every available portion of it is covered 

It would seem fitting, in a land whose Catholic people come so largely from Ireland, that more of the church architects 

should take their suggestions from these beautiful ruins,- mementoes of an age when the island of saints and learned 

men had not only carvers, metal-workers, and illuminators of manuscripts, but also architects, of the highest merit. 





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ST. PETER'S CHURCH 

MEETING-HOUSE HILL, DORCHESTER 



GOTHIC STYLE — T>. C. KEELY. ARCHITECT 
Pastor: Rev. Peter Ronan 



IN former years the residents of Dorchester were obliged to attend St. Gregory's 
Church, on the Milton line. The district was less thickly settled than now, and 



a larger proportion of the families were Protestant. Of late years, however. 
Catholics have been moving in this direction, from South Boston and the city proper, in 
such numbers as to necessitate a division of the parish. As many of the new-comers are 
people of comfortable means, the pastor has been enabled to project a church second to 
none, as the reader sees, in the elegance of its appointments. It is built of pudding-stone 
quarried from the site, and standing at the junction of seven thoroughfares, on the crest of Meeting-House 
Hill, presents a commanding and unobstructed view from every point of approach. 




*7 










ST. PETER'S CHURCH 
MEETING HOUSE HILL. DORCHESTER. 



Dctairattt) 1868 



ST. MARY'S ANNVNCIATION 

HARVARD AND NORFOLK STREETS, CAMBRIDGEPORT 




GOTHIC STYLE — MR. MURPHY AND I'. W. KOKI). ARllllIhriS 

Permanent Rector: Rev. Thomas Scully 



HIS Church, one of the three which were built for the people of Cambridge : by Rev. Mana se 

I P Dougherty, occupies the site of the old town hall. It ,s prov.ded W|ti> a pansh schoo 

which draws away eleven hundred boys and girls from the public schools of Cambndgeport and 

- which is Exceptional among institutions of this class in that it offers the advantages of an 

1LJ3&Z to" those who Jsh ^ pursue their = 3^,^— S J% 

higher department of the ^°? ^oTJn^To ■ a", ched to tL school are a gymnasium, a rcad- 

.cht^'r^towr: zp$ l rJSfEK ^zj^zttz 

iz er of enterprises for the profit and recreate of the young men oM s pan gy ^ . ( 

=^^0^^^ one oiy be a proficient athlete and at 

the same time an upright and intelligent citizen. 









ST. MARY'S OF THE ANNUNCIATION CHURCH PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS AND RESIDENCE 

CAMBRIDGEPORT MASS. 



Dciicattb 1864 



ST. GREGORY'S CHVRCH 

DORCHESTER AVENUE, NEAR MILTON 



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SEATING CAPACITY Soo GOTHIC STYLE — MR. MURPHY, ARCHITECT CONGREGATION 2500 

Previous Pastor: Rev. Thomas B. McNulty. 1860-75. Present Pastor: Rev. William H. Fitzpatrick 



i 



*' >•''" 

ST. Gregory's parish is situated on the southern frontier of the city. It includes Ashmont and 
Mattapan, and goes across the Neponset River to take in the town of Milton. Dorchester 
proper and Neponset have been cut off from it in the past, and preparations are now going on for the build- 
(r&j^))) ing of a new Church on Lauriat Avenue, near Franklin Park, which will ultimately be the centre of an inde- 
pendent parish. In spite of these reductions, St. Gregorys is still the largest in territory of all the parishes 
that enter Boston, and has the most widely scattered congregation. The Church was dismantled of its steeple 
by lightning in 1888, but the pastor is preparing to restore it to its original appearance, or something better; and, if we 
may judge from his success in founding the parishes in Neponset and in the neighborhood of Lauriat Avenue, the 
Catholics of the district will not have to wait long for the consummation of his efforts. In anticipation of a flow of 
Catholic population in this direction, along Dorchester Avenue, he has recently built a more suitable rectory by the 
side of the Church. 







■ 




ST. GREGORY'S CHURCH AND RESIDENCE 

DORCHESTER AVE., DORCHESTER DIS'CT. 




£orntv=stont I a ill 1572 



ST. COLUMBKILLE'S CHVRCH 



MARKET STREET. BRIGHTON 



GOTHIC STYLE MR. O'CONNOR, ARCHITECT 

Previous Pastors: Rev. J. M. Finotti. 1856-71. Rev. Patrick J. ROGERS, 1871-85 
Present Pastor: Rev. A. J. Rossi 



ST. COLUMBKILLE'S, though it has not yet assumed its final shape, as the spire remains to 
be added, is without question the most imposing piece of property in Brighton, worthy of a 
parish of such great area and such prospects of future development. The priest to whose efforts 
parishioners are indebted for so handsome an edifice, and whose name is commemorated in a tablet over 
the round window in front, was the second pastor, Rev. P. J. Rogers. On the right of the Church, but hidden 
from view, is a substantial rectory with large grounds, which have been much improved by the present pastor. 
Two important institutions are located within the limits of this parish. — St. John's Ecclesiastical Seminary, of 
which we furnish a description in this volume, and the new Convent of the Sisters of St. Joseph, who are now trans- 
ferred from their former location at Fresh Pond. 




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BRIGHTON. 



SEATING c APACITY 1 IOO 




DtSicaltO 1985 



CHURCH & ASSUMPTION 

HARVARD STREET, BROOKUNE 



GOTHIC STYLE — PBABODY A STEARNS, ARCHITECTS CONGREGATION 4 0O0 

Previous Pastors: Rev. Michael O'Beirnb, .854-56. Rev. Joseph M. Finotti, .856-73. 

Rev. Peter Lamb, 1S7J-7 1- 
Present Pastor: Rev. L. J. Morris. 

[N the delightful suburb of Brookline. among a total population of twelve 
thousand, there are four thousand Catholics, united in a single parish, and 
served by three clergymen. From .854 to ,883 they occupied a wooden chapel 
on Andem Place, and in the period before that held Sunday services in Lyceum hall. 
Of the first pastor little is known. During his pastorate the church was partially burned. 
His successor. Rev. j. M. Finotti. had been connected in his youth with the Jesuits. 
He was author of a Bibliography of Catholic American Literature, and the possessor 
.„ a valuable library and a collection of coins and medals, which were sold at auction after h« death. 
Rev Peter Lamb won the esteem of the town's people during his short residence among them, and his 
death was deeply lamented. During the term of his successor, the parish has completely outgrown its 
old quarters. The wooden church has been sold and the congregation installed in the more ornate 
structure which is represented on the following page. 





ST. MARY OF THE ASSUMPTION CHURCH AND RESIDENCE 

BROOKUNE. MASS. 




QcDitnttH 1S74 



Chvrch of the Sacred Heart 



EAST CAMBRIDGE 




GOTHIC STYLE — P. W. FORD, ARCHITECT 



Pastor: Rev. John O'Brien 

ALTHOUGH nominally the youngest parish in Cambridge, the Sacred Heart is really the oldest, 
and the one from which all the others have been developed. In 1842 a young priest was 
sent over from the Cathedral to live among the Catholics of Cambridge and minister to their wants. He united 
his flock in the old St. John's Church, and served them faithfully for two years, having in that time by his 
great ability established the parish on a footing which made the task of his successors comparatively easy. 
The name of this clergyman, Rev. John B. Fitzpatrick, is the first which occurs in the *^"*£T 
ria^e registers of the parish. The occasion of his departure was his promotion at the early age of thirty-two 
to°the rank of coadjutor-bishop of the Boston diocese, then the see of Bishop Fenwick. 

After Father Fitzpatrick there followed a long line of pastors, the most dist.nguishe ^^» 
Re, Manasses P. Dougherty. His labors, however, were more conspicuous in the Other parishes ^£»*£^ 
and are more appropriately chronicled in connection with them. The congregation finally grew to ^^*T* ^ 
services of five priests and far exceeding the capacity of the church. Father O'Brien, the ^\*^Z a e rc d 

pastorate perceived the need of a larger building, and undertook the task erecting one. ^^^^^ 

r-ir„ixs 52 z :™.:: c .-,=: si-i* r=,v: —,,.,. 



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©riginal Cb"«b Drticatrt 1320 



ST. MARY'S CHVRCH 

Corner Winthrop and Warren Streets, Charlestown 




Previous Pastors: Rev. P. Byrne, 1830-43- Rev. Georce F. Goodwin, i8 4 3"47- Very Rev. P. F. 

Lyndon, 1847-53. R ev- George A. Hamilton, 1853-74. Very Rev. William 

Byrne, D.D., 1874-78 



Present Pastor: 



N addition to the distinction of being our oldest parish, with the exception of the Cathedral. 
St. Mary's has been fortunate in a succession of noted pastors. Rev. P. Byrne, the first regular 
pastor, was one of the two priests whom Bishop Fenwick found laboring here on his arrival 
. - with Bishop England in 1825. Rev. G. F. Goodwin, his successor, was a native of Charlestown 
and a convert to the Catholic Church. Of Vicar-General Lyndon the reader of these notes will find frequent 
mention He was pastor of several churches, and was of great assistance to Archbishop Williams in the 
buildin* of his new Cathedral. Rev. G. A. Hamilton, formerly pastor in St. Albans, Vermont, and in Milford. 
was an°influential man in this district and the builder of the noble Church of St. Francis de Sales on Bunker 
Hill. Vicar-General Byrne is, perhaps, the best-known clergyman of the Archdiocese, and needs no description. The 
present pastor, Rev. Dr. McMahon, is one of the examiners of the clergy and a brother of the Bishop of Hartford. 

On August 13th. .890, the basement of St. Mary's was thronged with a multitude of mourners assembled at the 
funeral services held over the body of John Boyle O'Reilly, who had been a devout member of this parish during the 
latter years of his married life. 




Rev. John W. McMahon, D.D. 







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ST. PETER'S CHVRCH 

CONCORD AVENUE, CAMBRIDGE 



SEATING CAPACITY 1200 CONGREGATION 5500 

Previous Pastors: Rev. Manasses P. Dougherty, 1849-77. Rev. James E. O'Brien, 1877-86 
Present Pastor: Rev. JOHN FlaTLEY 



HAT Rev. James Fitton was to East Boston, and Rev. George Hamilton to Charlestown, 
Rev. Manasses P. Dougherty was to the University city across the Charles, — a clergyman of 
commanding character, possessed of a keen perception to note, and even to anticipate, the wants 
of his Catholic townspeople in the matter of Churches, and of great sagacity in overcoming the 
difficulties that lay in the way of providing accommodations for them. After a short service in St. Johns 
parish, he was transferred to the new St. Peter's Church on Concord Avenue, which he had himself built. 
Here he remained as pastor until his death, a period of nearly thirty years, during which, besides serving his 
own flock in such a manner as to win their deepest devotion, he assisted in the formation of two new parishes 
for the worshippers in Cambridgeport and near Harvard Square. His own Church is situated about midway 
between Old Cambridge, or that part of the city which surrounds Harvard College, and North Cambridge, and 
attended from both of these sections. During Father Dougherty's pastorate notable changes took place in the locality. 
The Harvard element increased in numbers with the rapid growth of the University, and spread northward along Con- 
cord Avenue and Brattle Street, so that St. Peter's Church, originally somewhat remote from the centre of Cambridge 
life, at the present day finds itself in the heart of a most aristocratic quarter. The priests' house, with its extensive 
grounds and long driveway, adjoining the Church, is one of the most attractive residences in the neighborhood. 
The present pastor has founded a school during the past year. 




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ST. PETER'S CHURCH AND RESIDENCE 
CAMBRIDGE MASS. 



DtSicatcb 1873 M 

ST. PAVL'S CHVRCH 

MOUNT AUBURN AND HOLYOKE STREETS, CAMBRIDGE 



SEATING CAPACITY 1250 

Previous Pas/or: Rev. M. P. Dougherty, 1873-75 




CONGREGATION 3500 

Present Pastor: Rev. William Orr 



•HIS quaint old temple, near Harvard Square, formerly the Shepherd Congregationalist Church, 
was built in 1830, and held by a Protestant society until its sale to Catholics in 1873. Rev. 
M P Dougherty was connected with it for a short time. In 1875 Rev. William Orr took hold and at once 
set about making improvements. He has organized a school of four hundred pupils, and recently, to meet the 
arowina requirements of his parish, enlarged and re-dedicated the Church. At the ceremony of re-ded,ca- 
tion as well as on several prior occasions, St. Paul's has been graced by the presence of B.shop Keane, of the 
Catholic' University at Washington. Bishop Keane is a favorite at Harvard College, many of whose professors attended 
the sermons which he delivered during his visits to Cambridge, in order to hear his views on the subject which has 
the most professional interest for then, and on which Bishop Keane is the most eloquent, -that of Chnshan educa- 
tion In this way the Catholic and Protestant elements in Cambridge have been drawn together of late, and an era 
of good feeling established, in pleasant contrast to the animosities that exist in many other places. 








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ST. PAULS CHURCH 
CAMBRIDGE MASS. 



DrtitnttU 1965 



ST. ROSE'S CHVRCH 



BROADWAY, CHELSEA 



GOTHIC STYLE — P. C. KEEI.V. ARCHITECT 

Previous Pastor: Very Rev. Mgr. Patrick Strain, Miss. Ap., 1S65-67 
Present Pastor: Rev. James McGlew 





.UT of twenty-seven thousand residents of Chelsea, one-fourth are members of St. Roses 
- ' Parish The Church was built by Very Rev. Patrick Strain, permanent rector of St. 
Mary's Church in Lynn, whose selection for the dignity of domestic prelate to the Pope has recently excited 
so much approval. Mg, Strain was connected with Chelsea for only a short time, and the greater par, of 
the valuable parish property is the fruit of the labors of Rev. James McGlew. assisted by the hbera, contn- 

butions of his people. . , . 

A large brick schoo.-building stands by the side of the Church. In the rear of th.s ,s a smaller house wh.ch ,s 
occupied as a Convent by some twenty Sisters of Providence, who are engaged in teaching the e.ght hundred pup.is. 








ST. ROSE'S CHURCH AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS 
BROADWAY, CHELSE \ 



ST. MARTS CHVRCH 



DEDHAM 




SEATING CAPACITY IOOO GOTHIC STYLE — P. W. FORD, ARCHITECT 

Previous Pastors: Rev. John P. Brennan. Rev. Denis J. O'Donovan. Rev. Robert J. Johnson, 1878-90 

Present Pastor: Rev. John H. Fleming 



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THE entire population of Dedham, a little over seven thousand people, is less than the congre- 
gations of many of the large parishes in Boston. Yet few parishes in Boston can boast of 
a more impressive Church than the one which serves the Catholic portion of this little town. For this the 
Dedham people have to thank, in a great measure, their former pastor, during whose term of service the build- 
ing was dedicated. Much credit is also due to Mr. Nickerson, a wealthy Protestant resident of the town, who 
contributed ten thousand dollars to this object and manifested his generous interest in other ways; and to the 
Bullard family, also of Dedham, from whose quarries the stone was taken without expense. The material of the Church 
is Dedham stone, the rich color and durability of which have recommended it to the architects of Trinity Church on 
Copley Square, and of other buildings in which a fine color effect was desired. Services are still held in the basement 
chapel, the body of the Church being as yet unfinished. 

The size of the congregation cannot be stated with accuracy, as the new pastor is engaged at present on a cen- 
sus, but it is probable that the proportion of Catholics is at least as great as in other towns of the neighborhood, such 
as Brookline, Chelsea and Somerville. 








ST. MARY'S CHURCH 
DEDHAM, M ■ 



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SEATING CAPACITY I3OO 




Drttcalrl) 1875 



ST. JOSEPH'S CHVRCH 

UNION SQUARE, SOMERVILLE 



C.OTHIC STYLE— MR. MURPHV, ARCHITECT 

Pastor: Rev. Christopher T. McGrath 



CONGREGATION 6500 



•HE Catholics of our suburban cities and towns are not behind those of Boston in the deter- 
mination to have churches to which they can point with laudable pride. Dissatisfied w.th 
the halls and makeshifts which served them until .873, the people of Somerville at that t,me 
set about erecting an edifice which would creditably evince their piety and generos.ty. The result 
"oflheir efforts was the present St. Joseph's Church. The congregation has also built a Convent School winch 
is attended by six hundred children, under the Sisters of Notre Dame, and a comfortable res.dence for the 
pastor who has ministered to them so faithfully during nearly twenty-five years. 

Until ,88, the parish embraced the entire city, but in that year, owing to the growth of populate a 
considerate section, including Spring and Winter Hills, was cut off and the residents provided with a separate place 
vorship, — the new St. Anne's Church. 





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ABOUT ten years ago it was found that there were living up on the hills in the northern 
part of Somerville, a mile or more away from the Church in Union Square, a number of 
Catholics sufficient to form a separate parish. The congregation had worshipped previously in the hall of the 
Foster Grammar School, loaned for that purpose on Sundays by the school committee of the town. 

St. Anne's Church was built for them by Rev. C. T. McGrath, and Rev. J. B. Galvin appointed pastor. 
It is situated on historic ground, only a short distance from the house occupied by Gen. Charles Lee when he 
held command of the left wing of the American army besieging Boston, and threw up breastworks on the hills to 
prevent the British gun-boats from passing up the Mystic River. On the Charlestown frontier of the parish are the 
ruins of the Ursuline Convent, now a part of Somerville. 







ST. ANN'S CHURCH AND PAROCHIAL RESIDENCE 
BEDFORD STREET. SOMERVILLE. 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06380 668 





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